Green Death Wish: Willful Destruction of Affordable Energy

Germany’s green-energy program is neither green, nor an energy program. Rather, it is a form of ultra-regressive taxation — in effect, a state-sponsored cult of human sacrifice for weather control.

Germany has brought the world many remarkable political innovations, including government by bureaucracy, the welfare state, regimentation of education, Red, Brown, and Green parties, theoretical and applied racial science and engineering [Nazis], the precautionary principle, and the systematic philosophical and practical negation of Judeo-Christian ethics. Its heartless energy policy is entirely consistent with that history. __ Robert Zubrin

Denmark and Germany, the two countries that have indulged the most in renewable energy, have by far the highest electrical prices in Europe. Germans and Danes are paying about 30 cents per kilowatt for electricity while the median for the continent is the Netherlands at 18.21. Countries that rely heavily on nuclear are paying far below the median. These include France, which is 70 percent nuclear, and countries of the old Soviet bloc – Romania, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The same phenomenon has emerged in the United States, where California, which is heavily into renewables, pay 50 percent higher prices than neighboring Nevada.

Denmark and Germany, the two countries that have indulged the most in renewable energy, have by far the highest electrical prices in Europe. Germans and Danes are paying about 30 cents per kilowatt for electricity while the median for the continent is the Netherlands at 18.21. Countries that rely heavily on nuclear are paying far below the median. These include France, which is 70 percent nuclear, and countries of the old Soviet bloc – Romania, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The same phenomenon has emerged in the United States, where California, which is heavily into renewables, pay 50 percent higher prices than neighboring Nevada.
European Electricity Prices

According to EU data, Germany’s average residential electricity rate is 29.8 cents per kilowatt hour. This is approximately double the 14.2 cents and 15.9 cents per kWh paid by residents of Germany’s neighbors Poland and France, respectively, and almost two and a half times the U.S. average of 12 cents per kWh. Germany’s industrial electricity rate of 16 cents per kWh is also much higher than France’s 9.6 cents or Poland’s 8.3 cents.

For the rich, $1,700 per year in electric bills might be a pittance, or at most a nuisance. But for the poor who are just scraping by, such a burden is simply brutal.

… Germany’s nominal 65 GW of solar and wind generation capacity is worth about as much as 13 GW capacity in conventional power plants. Of the 614,000 GW hours that Germany generated in 2014, 56,000 GWh came from wind and 35,000 GWh from solar, for an actual combined average power of 10.4 GW, or 14.8 percent of all electricity generated. About half of this, or 5.2 GW, has been developed since 2005.

However, in 2011 Germany had 20 GW of capacity in nuclear power plants, producing more than twice as much electricity as wind and solar do currently, at less than half the cost, with no carbon emissions whatsoever. But, using the rather improbable threat of a Fukushima-like tsunami as a pretext, the nation’s elites decided to shut them down; 8.3 GW have already been eliminated.__ http://www.nationalreview.com/article/418263/germanys-green-power-program-crushes-poor-robert-zubrin

The Germans are shutting down good power to make room for abominable, destructive green energy. Neighboring countries are getting sick and tired of Germany dumping this low-quality, unpredictably timed energy onto their power grids.

Notably, the Czech Republic seems to regard unplanned power flows from Germany as a serious national security risk. As reported by the German magazine Der Spiegel, the Czech national electricity transmission system operator CEPS announced investment of more than 72 million Euros in phase shifting transformers at the German-Czech border – expected to be operational in 2016 – in order to shield the Czech Republic from the real possibility of a potential future blackout (Read on the ABB website on how to control power flow with phase shifting transformers).___ http://breakingenergy.com/2015/06/12/is-germany-outsourcing-its-future-energy-security/

It is not that Germany is generating too much electricity from “renewables.” No, Germany is generating unpredictable intermittent low-quality electricity — and any amount of that poor, destructive kind of electricity is TOO MUCH!

Germany and its neighbors are now facing an unusual problem. With the dramatic increase in green energy usage, Germany is generating so much electricity from renewables that it is finding it hard to handle it. ___ http://www.realclearenergy.org/articles/2015/08/18/germany_struggles_with_too_much_renewable_energy_108685.html

It is a catastrophic turning that Germany has chosen, and along with it, the rest of Europe. Remember: customer demand for high quality electric power varies from second to second. Any viable form of electrical power generation must be able to produce high quality power at precisely the times that the power is needed. The alternative is a progressive degrading of power quality and availability.

Unpredictable, unreliable, low-quality electrical energy — such as is produced by big wind and big solar — is the exact opposite of what is needed by delicately balanced power grids, which must maintain voltage, frequency, and phase within strict limits. That is why large industries are moving their new investment and construction overseas, far away from the green energy quagmire of Germany and much of the rest of Europe.

Der Spiegel reports that according to a survey, one in five industrial companies is moving investment abroad because of high energy costs and increased risk of power outages. The price of Germany’s electricity and unreliable power have also led to the loss of jobs in energy-intensive industries. A study by Universidad Rey Juan Carlos on the Spanish experience with the European Union’s green energy agenda concluded that more jobs are lost than created and pursuing the green agenda hindered Spain’s recovery from the 2009 financial crisis. The study concluded that pursuing similar policies in the U.S. would destroy nine jobs for every four created. ___ http://www.richmond.com/opinion/their-opinion/guest-columnists/article_bc227dc9-c2d7-52e8-ad40-30ea46c0bcc1.html

The former economics minister of Germany has called Germany’s green Energiewende plan “a disaster,” and “one of the most dreadful businesses that has ever burdened the German economy“.

Germany’s Energiewende has been sharply criticized in the past as it is in large part the main driver behind the country’s skyrocketing electricity prices, unstable power grid conditions, growing energy poverty and for marring the landscape with inefficient and ugly industrial wind turbines.

According to Clement [former German economic minister], Germany’s electricity prices are among the very highest in Europe and has led energy intensive heavy industries to pack up and leave. Clement says a number of industries are now “under massive pressure”. __ http://notrickszone.com/2015/01/27/former-german-minister-of-economics-calls-energiewende-a-disaster-careened-completely-out-of-control/

Here is an accurate summary of “Energiewende:”

1) Renewable energy is expensive. Any country that attempts to raise its contribution from renewable resources is going to end up paying higher prices. This is also visible in California, which has the highest percentage of renewables in the continental United States and also pays the highest electrical bills west of New Jersey.

2) Advancing renewables will require a series of regulatory rules that give special consideration to renewables while failing to reward the reliability of other generating sources.

3) At a certain point, the intermittency of renewable sources will threaten the dependability of the grid. Special measures will be required to prevent the problem from spreading to other regions.

Other than that, Germany’s Energiewende seems to be doing just fine [!] __ http://www.realclearenergy.org/articles/2015/07/16/whats_going_on_in_germany_108594.html

Spain was forced to step back from the green precipice in order to allow its economy to recover from the aftermaths of the green Zapatero disaster. Germany may have already waited too long.

More:

Energy storage can’t fix the problems posed by intermittent, unreliable, low-quality energy

Renewable Energy: The Most Expensive Policy Disaster … … Britain’s green disaster

Europe’s green disaster

Basic Energy Primer (PDF)

The green energy idiocy one sees in Europe, in the US Obama administration, and scattered elsewhere around the world is one of the greatest dangers to an abundant and expansive human future. It represents a deeply pessimistic green worldview — a “death wish” directed toward “the rest of us.”

It is based upon hysterics generated by the in-bred pseudoscience of climate apocalypse. This green idiocy — climate apocalypse movement is due for a severe reckoning, as reality comes back around to face it head-on.

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3 Responses to Green Death Wish: Willful Destruction of Affordable Energy

  1. bob sykes says:

    Wjhat is it in the German psyche that continually produces these destructive manias?

    • alfin2101 says:

      All the wars of the 20th cent. and communist rapine of the east until 1989 left Germany with insufficient testosterone to oppose corrupt idiots such as Schroeder and Fischer — and their disciples. Merkel has more testosterone than most German men, but not enough to understand that Germany is dead without nuclear power and natural gas turbines for peaking.

      Hitler was a meddling fool in WWII (similar to Putin in many ways) but he understood the need for hard power in the world. Germany’s “soft power” and “green power” will be the death of Deutschland.

  2. yoananda says:

    without major breakthrough in energy, there is no more such a thing as “affordable energy”.
    There just can be “less expensive energy”.

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